Garlic Roast Pork

If you’re a garlic lover, this Garlic Roast Pork is for you. Coated with a simple blend of garlic, herbs, and olive oil, this pork loin roast is delicious!

If you’re a garlic lover, this Garlic Roast Pork is for you. Coated with a simple blend of garlic, herbs, and olive oil, this pork loin roast is delicious!

Are you a garlic lover? I sure am. At least a little bit is good almost anywhere. And a LOT is good, too, like in Creamy Garlic Chicken, Hawaiian Garlic Shrimp, and Garlic Knots.

Tons of garlic makes this recipe great as well. And it couldn’t be easier. It’s just garlic, herbs, and olive oil pureed into a paste, then the paste gets slathered onto a pork loin. Roast, slice, and dig in.

A Little about Pork Loin

It’s easy to confuse pork loin and pork tenderloin, so let’s clear that up before we get to the recipe.

Basically, a pork loin is a pork rib roast without the ribs, essentially a cylindrical piece of meat that’s about 4 inches in diameter. It can weigh up to 8 or 10 pounds, but typically you’ll see it cut into shorter cylinders weighing 1 to 5 pounds. Slicing the cylinder crosswise gives you boneless pork chops.

Besides the recipe below, other ways to enjoy a pork loin include Air Fryer Pork Loin, Bacon-Wrapped Pork Loin, and Pork Loin Carnitas.

A tenderloin is also a cylindrical piece of meat, but much smaller. It only weighs about a pound. Because it’s so much smaller, a tenderloin won’t cook the same as a loin, so it’s important to note that this recipe is for a loin—not a tenderloin.

Pair it with a Reverse Sear

As I do for several roasts—like a basic pork roast or leg of lamb—I use the reverse sear method for my Garlic Roast Pork. Here’s how it works.

Instead of searing your meat at a high temperature and then lowering the heat so the roast can cook through, a reverse sear starts with a lower temperature until the meat reaches the desired temperature, then you let it rest for a bit, then you put it back into a really hot oven for just a few minutes to get a nice brown crust.

It’s really simple and easy and it works amazingly well.

With all that pork, garlic, and herb goodness cooked to perfection, all you need on the side are some simply cooked vegetables and maybe a little applesauce.

Enjoy!

Christine :)

 

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Garlic Roast Pork


  • Author: Jill Hough
  • Prep Time: 20 minutes
  • Cook Time: 1 to 1 1/2 hours, plus 30 minutes to rest
  • Total Time: 17 minute
  • Yield: 6-8 servings

Description

If you’re a garlic lover, this pork loin roast is for you. Coated with a simple blend of garlic, herbs, and olive oil, it’s easy, tasty, and garliky delicious!


Ingredients

  • 12 cloves garlic
  • 3 Tbsp. olive oil
  • 2 Tbsp. fresh rosemary leaves
  • 2 Tbsp. fresh sage leaves
  • 2 Tbsp. fresh thyme leaves
  • 1 tsp. salt
  • 1 tsp. pepper
  • 2 1/2– to 3-lb. boneless pork loin roast
  • About 3 ribs celery (optional)

Instructions

  1. Preheat the oven to 350°F.
  2. In a food processor, combine the garlic, olive oil, rosemary, sage, thyme, salt, and pepper and pulse until it becomes a coarse, wet paste. Spread the paste all over the pork.
  3. Put the pork on a rack in a roasting pan fat side up. If you don’t have a rack use about 3 stalks of celery arranged in the pan.
  4. Roast until the internal temperature is 145-160°F, 20 to 25 minutes per pound. 145°F is considered safe for pork according to the USDA. It will be moist and slightly pink in the center. If you prefer your pork fully white and well done, then go with the 160°F temperature.
  5. Cover the roasting pan with foil and let rest for 30 minutes.
  6. Meanwhile, increase the oven to 475°F.
  7. Roast uncovered for another 10 minutes, until the meat is nicely browned. (If any parts of the pork are already nicely browned, cover them with a piece of foil before the final roast.)
  8. Slice the roast and serve immediately.

Notes

For even more flavorful meat, brine the pork before you roast it. But if you do, cut the salt in this recipe to a little more than 1/2 teaspoon. See this post for how to brine and why it makes such a difference.